2016 : From Exploration to Innovation

Exploration is at the core of every discovery. Each journey to innovation has a beginning. It might have originated from exploring our beautifully intricate surroundings or from delving into our minds and projecting our ideas and findings outwards. TED is a platform for expressing our innovations which in turn encourage thought, creativity and collaboration.

Every day new innovations are flourishing in both social and scientific worlds, with science acting as a collaborative engine that drives innovation. The continuous new technological advancements of mobile technology and social media are all innovations that have knock off effects, for example changes in social behaviour. These effects can, in themselves, inspire exploration, and in turn, further innovation.

Yet, innovation is not a concept exclusive to the physical sciences. Spiritual writer Eckhart Tolle went through an experience of a personal exploration that left him, as he describes it, in a state of utter bliss. He was at peace with himself and the world requiring no external stimulants to please him. Eckhart wrote down the process he went through in an attempt to help today's fast-paced world find inner peace. His exploration led to a life changing innovation for himself which he is now able to project outwards in order to allow others to achieve it too.

A single movement can generate a myriad of innovations that change the cultural landscape. Rock'n' Roll, for one, sparked an entire cultural revolution. Their musical style resonated with the rebellious youth and pushed them to reconsider the standard conventions of the world. The Beatles, likewise, are said to be the catalysts of the hippie movement - their music let people explore their under standing of themselves and the conventions they existed in. The realisation allowed people to rebel against what is 'normal' and push for an arguably more tolerant and understanding world.

In the literary field, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov said, "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' (I've found it!), but 'That's funny...". At the TEDxUniversityofGlasgow 2016 conference, we will celebrate the exciting journey from 'That's funny' to 'Eureka!'. Our speakers, having taken the road less travelled, will tell about their progress from the unknown to the new. Our audience will get a glimpse of the discoveries that have been made in various fields of science, arts and life in general. As a result, the 2016 conference will celebrate the innovations made and hopefully inspire more exploration of ourselves and the world around us.


Dr Stefan Hild

Jamie Gallagher is an interdisciplinary scientist and communicator, recently recognised as one of the '175 Faces of Chemistry' by the Royal Society of Chemistry. He believes the more interconnected science is, the stronger it becomes. Jamie advocates for more diversity in scientific approaches, but, more importantly, diversity in scientists. He talks about how gender-stereotyped toys influence children's career choices, what must be done to diversify the face of science, and how diversity connects with success.

Dr Theodore Koutmeridis

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.

Dr Maggie Rostron

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.

Miles Padgett

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.

David Timis

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.

Choral Stimulation

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.

Dr Carla Brown

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.

Karina Atkinson

A member of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Colider at CERN, Adrian Buzatu is concerned with the bigger questions in life. He has done work on discovering the Higgs Boson and will be talking about the different ways the question "Where do we come from?" can be answered, starting from the psychological and biological, and ending with the fundamental ingredients of the Universe and what keeps them together.